The Princess Bride

What happens when the most beautiful girl in the world marries the handsomest prince of all time and he turns out to be…well…a lot less than the man of her dreams?

As a boy, William Goldman claims, he loved to hear his father read the S. Morgenstern classic, The Princess Bride. But as a grown-up he discovered that the boring parts were left out of good old Dad’s recitation, and only the “good parts” reached his ears.

Now Goldman does Dad one better. He’s reconstructed the “Good Parts Version” to delight wise kids and wide-eyed grownups everywhere.

What’s it about? Fencing. Fighting. True Love. Strong Hate. Harsh Revenge. A Few Giants. Lots of Bad Men. Lots of Good Men. Five or Six Beautiful Women. Beasties Monstrous and Gentle. Some Swell Escapes and Captures. Death, Lies, Truth, Miracles, and a Little Sex.

In short, it’s about everything.

I think I am one of only a few people who didn’t love this book. It’s not that I didn’t like it, I just thought I would like it more than I did. I think part of this was that I didn’t read the blurb before I started and thought the authors notes were just in my copy. The authors notes just annoyed me because it made me feel like I was missing out on part of the story and I will admit after a whole chapter was cut out I just ignored them. I really love this film because it of the mixture of action and romance but I felt the book didn’t have to same energy particularly with the romance. The story does have plenty going on and the language isn’t too complicated but there wasn’t a lot of chemistry build between Buttercup and Westley.  It was a really easy read though and once I got into it it only took me a few hours to read it. I am glad I have read it after enjoying the film so much but for me its one of those rare occasions where the film is better. 

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books I Wouldn’t Mind Santa Bringing Me

The Broke and The Bookish each week provide us with a topic to blog a list of top ten of various things. With Christmas just around the corner this week it is our Top Ten Books we wouldn’t mind Santa bringing. Although I have a huge to-read list the books on my Christmas list are a bit different because they include more non-fiction reading and books that I had when I was little and really want a copy of again.

Fiction

1. Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

2. Saving June by Hannah Harrington

3. The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Childhood Favourites

4. Roald Dhal collection

Biographies 

5. Life & Laughing by Michael McIntyre

6. Small Man In A Book by Rob Brydon

Film & TV

7. Harry Potter Film Wizardry by Warner Brothers

 

8. The 100 Most Pointless Things In The World by Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman

9. QI. The Book of General Ignorance by John Lloyd

History

10. How Girl Guides Won The War by Janie Hampton

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Freebie – Top Ten Classics I Want To Read

This week The Broke and The Bookish have lets us pick our own topics for Top Ten Tuesday. I have to admit I really struggled to come up with something, I wanted something interesting but I have ended up going for books that are considered to be classics that I want to read. I haven’t really read a lot classic books. I often struggle with the language but here at ten that I would like to make myself get through.

1. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Guy Montag is a fireman. His job is to burn books, which are forbidden, being the source of all discord and unhappiness. Even so, Montag is unhappy; there is discord in his marriage. Are books hidden in his house? The Mechanical Hound of the Fire Department, armed with a lethal hypodermic, escorted by helicopters, is ready to track down those dissidents who defy society to preserve and read books.

2. The Princess Bride by William Goldman

What happens when the most beautiful girl in the world marries the handsomest prince of all time and he turns out to be…well…a lot less than the man of her dreams?

3. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

We follow Esther Greenwood’s personal life from her summer job in New York with Ladies’ Day magazine, back through her days at New England’s largest school for women, and forward through her attempted suicide, her bad treatment at one asylum and her good treatment at another, to her final re-entry into the world like a used tyre: “patched, retreaded, and approved for the road” … Esther Greenwood’s account of her year in the bell jar is as clear and readable as it is witty and disturbing.

4. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

The four March sisters–Meg, Amy, Beth, and feisty Jo–share the joys and sorrows of growing up while their father is away at war. The family is poor in worldly goods, but rich in love and character.

5. Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis de Bernieres

In the early days of the Second World War, before Benito Mussolini invaded Greece, Dr. Iannis practices medicine on the island of Cephalonia, accompanied by his daughter, Pelagia, to whom he imparts much of his healing art. Even when the Italians do invade, life isn’t so bad–at first anyway. The officer in command of the Italian garrison is the cultured Captain Antonio Corelli, who responds to a Nazi greeting of “Heil Hitler” with his own “Heil Puccini,” and whose most precious possession is his mandolin. It isn’t long before Corelli and Pelagia are involved in a heated affair–despite her engagement to a young fisherman, Mandras, who has gone off to join Greek partisans. Love is complicated enough in wartime, even when the lovers are on the same side. And for Corelli and Pelagia, it becomes increasingly difficult to negotiate the minefield of allegiances, both personal and political, as all around them atrocities mount, former friends become enemies, and the ugliness of war infects everyone it touches.

6. 1984 by George Orwell

Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, Orwell’s narrative is timelier than ever. 1984 presents a startling and haunting vision of the world, so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish. No one can deny the power of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of multiple generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions a legacy that seems only to grow with the passage of time.

7. All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Paul Baumer enlisted with his classmates in the German army of World War I. Youthful, enthusiastic, they become soldiers. But despite what they have learned, they break into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches. And as horrible war plods on year after year, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principles of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other–if only he can come out of the war alive.

8. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

A ten-year-old orphan comes to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors where she discovers an invalid cousin and the mysteries of a locked garden.

9. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Far in the future, the World Controllers have finally created the ideal society. In laboratories worldwide, genetic science has brought the human race to perfection. From the Alpha-Plus mandarin class to the Epsilon-Minus Semi-Morons, designed to perform menial tasks, man is bred and educated to be blissfully content with his pre-destined role.

But, in the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre, Bernard Marx is unhappy. Harbouring an unnatural desire for solitude, feeling only distaste for the endless pleasures of compulsory promiscuity, Bernard has an ill-defined longing to break free. A visit to one of the few remaining Savage Reservations where the old, imperfect life still continues, may be the cure for his distress…

10. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Published a year before her death at the age of thirty, Emily Brontë’s only novel is  set in the wild, bleak Yorkshire Moors. Depicting the relationship of Cathy and Heathcliff, Wuthering Heights creates a world of its own, conceived with an instinct for poetry and for the dark depths of human psychology.