Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Best/Worst Series Enders

This week The Broke and The Bookish have asked for our Top Ten Best/Worst Series Enders. When we have a choice like that I like to put some from both and this week is no different. I think sometimes I might over read the topics because for this week I considered that you could have favourite or worst ends in terms of what actually happened but also just having a good or bad last book, I’ve gone the second option because its the way its written that makes what happens good in the end and it also made writing my list a lot easier.

Favourites

  • Rapture – Fallen Series by Lauren Kate
  • United We Spy – Gallagher Girls by Ally Carter
  • Brothers to the Death – The Saga of Larten Crepsley by Darren Shan
  • Monsters of Men – Chaos Walking Series by Patrick Ness
  • Sons of Destiny – The Saga  of Darren Shan by Darren Shan
  • Ascend – Trylle by Amanda Hocking

Worst

  • Requiem – Delirium trilogy by Lauren Oliver
  • Double Crossed – Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
  • Missing Me – Girl Missing Series by Sophie McKenzie
  • Extras – Uglies Series by Scott Westerfeld

 What Are Your Best and Worst Series Enders?

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Book I Thought I’d Like More/Less Than I Did

This weeks topic from The Broke and The Bookish is Top Ten Books I thought I’d like more or less than I did. I don’t think before I started blogging I would have had any on the thought I like less list but now I have more on that list. I think we could have just picked on but I have gone for a bit of both.

Thought I’d Like More

  • Warm Bodies by Issac Marion I was really excited about this book becuase it seemed like a really original idea but for me there wasn’t enought excitement in it. 
  • The Auschwitz Violin by Maria Angels Anglada Books about the war tend to grab my attention and because I like music I thought this sounded really interesting but I found it lacked the emotional connection. 
  • Uglies Series by Scott Westerfeld Dystopian is another thing that makes me pick up a book and I liked the idea of a world obsessed with beauty because it is becoming true but the main character was just totally unlikeable. 
  • Delirium by Lauren Oliver This was another dystopian that I thought had merit in its idea but just didn’t have the drive for me. 
  • The Medusa Project by Sophie McKenzie I love how Sophie Mckenzie writes action books that still feel realistic and I was looking forward to this series but it didn’t like up to her Blood series. 
  • The Fault In Our Stars by John Green This one might be a bit contreversial as I know how much people love John Green but for me this story wasn’t what everyone made it out to be I think just because I have read a lot of similar stuff. 
  • The Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis My disappointment from this book may be because of my age but I felt this book missed a bit of action. 

Though I’d Like Less

  • Before I Go To Sleep by SJ Watson I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book but everyone kept recommending it to me so I gave it a try and it blew me away. Totally original idea and racing plot. 
  • The Black Pear by Alan Porter This was a kindle freebie that I thought I would try as I don’t usually read a lot of scary mystery and it was free so worth it but it turned out to be really interesting. 
  • Pandemonium by Lauren Oliver After not enjoying the first book in the series as much as I expected I was just reading this to see what happened but the different lay out of the book and more action going on made it really enjoyable. 

What Books Did You Find Better Or Worse Than You Expected?

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Most Frustrating Characters Ever

This week The Broke and The Bookish have given us a great topic, out Top Ten Most Frustrating Characters Ever. I think this is a brilliant topic cause there are some character’s that really drive me crazy.

1. Seb from Angel Fire by L.A. Weatherly It really frustrated me when Seb was introduced into this series because I didn’t want anyone getting in the way of Willow and Alex. Throughout the book he seems so sure of himself and how he wants to love willow and I just find it arrogant. I don’t want them to end up together. 

2. Corrine Dollanganger from Flowers in the Attic by Virginia Andrews How any mother could do what she does to her children is beyond me. I don’t know how anyone can not be frustrated be her.

3. Aaron from The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness This may give a little bit away about the book if you haven’t read it by Aaron really annoyed me because he just wouldn’t die. He kept coming back and getting in the way at the last minute. 

4. Zack from Gallagher Girls by Ally Carter Zack particularlt annoys me in the latest book of this series because he can’t just admit his feelings for Cammie and let them be together. He even lets her think bad of him and although it is because of his spy training it still infuriates me.

5. Lena from The Caster Chronicles by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl In the second book in this series Lena goes totally off the rails and I just can’t understand her. It seems to go against everything she says in the first book and that annoys me. 

6. Bilbo Baggins from The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien I don’t know is this counts but the reason Bilbo frustrates me is because he isn’t a likeable character in the book but in the film he is palyed by Martin Freeman who I think it brilliant. 

7. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen How can anyone not find Darcy frustating? He can’t seem to allow himself to accept his feelings for Elizabeth and seems ignorant to the fact he is seem by other as pompus

8. Tally from Uglies by Scott Westerfeld Tally is just one of those main characters that there is nothing to like about her. She can’t make up her mind about what she wants and ends up taking the wrong side and turning into everything she didn’t want to be. 

9. Peeta Mallark from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins Peeta is only frustrating in the last book in the series and it isn’t really his fault but it frustrates me how he looses his memory. All through the series his love and how he treats Katniss is that of a perfect gentleman and it drives me crazy that he looses all of that.

10. Edward Cullen from The Twilight Saga by Stephenie Meyer I do mostly like Edward however there are a few things that really frustrate me about him. The first was when he leaves in the second book. I understand why he does it but it really is unnecessary and not only does he put her in more danger but breaks his promise her. The other things are in the last book, one when he wont believe that he hasn’t hurt her after they sleep together and then wont sleep with her again and then again with the way he deals with the pregnancy. 

Which Character’s Really Frustrate You?

John Green (and Me) on Likeable Character’s

  

My Tumblr dashboard page is often presenting to me new quotes by John Green and almost all are worth reading. This one in particular has caught my attention today however as last night I was writing my Top Ten Tuesday post about frustrating characters.

I understand that a book is suppose to be about the story, books were created to allow people to pass on stories to one another, but for me the characters are just as important if not more. I find that if I can’t connect to the main character I struggle to connect to the story, even if I love the idea of the plot. Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies series is an example of this as I thought the idea of a totally vain society is something we could easily become but his main character Tally was just awful and so I couldn’t enjoy reading the book because I was to busy being frustrated at how she behaved. Of course all books need to have a ‘bad guy’ in them so the main characters has someone to over come and I am not saying you have to like every character you read but although I appreciate the point John Green is trying to make I think what makes a good book is at least a likeable main character.

Are Likeable Character’s Important To You In Making A Book Good?  

Friday Finds 21/12

Friday Find is a meme I found through Should Be Reading. It is a weekly post where you share the book titles you discovered or heard about during the past week. These can be books you were told about,  discovered while browsing online or you bought.

Amazingly my list this week is just too books, and they are just Novella’s. I have to admit I am quite proud of myself. I also finally picked up The Book Thief at Waterstones so looking forward to reading that too.

 

  • Abandon Changes by John M. Cusick
  • Stupid Perfect World by Scott Westerfeld

What Books Have You Discovered This Week?

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books That Make You Think

This weeks Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and The Bookish is Top Ten Books That Make You Think. They have suggested books that make you think about the world or people or life. I think my list has books that cover all those area’s although I think most books have some element that makes you think.

1. Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

She is pretty and talented – sweet sixteen and never been kissed. He is seventeen; gorgeous and on the brink of a bright future. And now they have fallen in love. But… they are brother and sister.

Seventeen-year-old Lochan and sixteen-year-old Maya have always felt more like friends than siblings. Together they have stepped in for their alcoholic, wayward mother to take care of their three younger siblings. As defacto parents to the little ones, Lochan and Maya have had to grow up fast. And the stress of their lives—and the way they understand each other so completely—has also also brought them closer than two siblings would ordinarily be. So close, in fact, that they have fallen in love. Their clandestine romance quickly blooms into deep, desperate love. They know their relationship is wrong and cannot possibly continue. And yet, they cannot stop what feels so incredibly right. As the novel careens toward an explosive and shocking finale, only one thing is certain: a love this devastating has no happy ending.

For me this is the most contreversial book I have ever read. Put bluntly it is about incest. Although I don’t like to put my Top Ten Books in an order this is my number one this book because it  is an issue people I have discussed this book with feel very strongly about and I really feel that reading this book will make you reconsider you feelings towards it. 

2. Noughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society.

Sephy is a Cross — a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought — a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum — a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together?

I love this book! Although great changes are occurring we still live in a world where white people are dominant. What makes this book so good is that in a world where black people have all the power we are made to question how we would feel if we were in that position and as a result how people are really feeling right now. I think  Blackman’s idea to change what we see going on is what makes this book so powerful and I hope it makes people think as much as it makes me. 

3. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult

Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate — a life and a role that she has never challenged…until now. Like most teenagers, Anna is beginning to question who she truly is. But unlike most teenagers, she has always been defined in terms of her sister — and so Anna makes a decision that for most would be unthinkable, a decision that will tear her family apart and have perhaps fatal consequences for the sister she loves. 

This book I think raises several issues that will make you think. Should you be allowed to have a genetically engineered child to help its sibling? Can you put one child through hell to save another? Should a young teenager have rights of their own body? This book I imagine must make parents think the most as in essence it is almost like having a favourite child. 

4. Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Everybody gets to be supermodel gorgeous. What could be wrong with that? Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can’t wait. Not for her license — for turning pretty. In Tally’s world, your sixteenth birthday brings an operation that turns you from a repellent ugly into a stunningly attractive pretty and catapults you into a high-tech paradise where your only job is to have a really great time. In just a few weeks Tally will be there.

But Tally’s new friend Shay isn’t sure she wants to be pretty. She’d rather risk life on the outside. When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world and it isn’t very pretty. The authorities offer Tally the worst choice she can imagine: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. The choice Tally makes changes her world forever.

This book challenges our growing obsession with our looks. What would the price really be if we were all pretty? and is it worth it so that we can all feel equal? Personally I don’t think it would be that simple and I don’t think it is worth risking our health for our looks. 

5.You Against Me by Jenny Downham

If someone hurts your sister and you’re any kind of man, you seek revenge, right? If your brother’s been accused of a terrible crime and you’re the main witness, then you banish all doubt and defend him. Isn’t that what families do? When Mikey’s sister claims a boy assaulted her at a party, his world of work and girls begins to fall apart. When Ellie’s brother is charged with the crime, but says he didn’t do it, her world of revision, exams and fitting in at a new school begins to unravel. When Mikey and Ellie meet, two worlds collide. Brave and unflinching, this is a novel of extraordinary skillfulness and almost unbearable tension. It’s a book about loyalty and the choices that come with it. But above all it’s a book about love – for one’s family and for another

Does loyalty to your family come before love? On You Against Me we have too characters who’s siblings have had more than a large fall out. When they meet they are unaware of who each other is and fall for each other however when they realise who each other is they are caught between how they feel about each other and their families. This books make you think about loyalty. If someone in your family gets into trouble should you have to suffer to? 

6. Red Tears by Joanna Kenrick

Emily Bowyer is a normal, confident teenager. But beneath the surface she has a wretched secret. Because, for Emily, life isn’t as much fun as it would appear. Her friends are going off her and her parents only seem to care about her troubled brother. Tension, pressure, anxiety, anger and self-hatred – where does it go when no one will listen?

Red Tears deals with depression and self-harm. When I read this book self-harm was very openly going on in my school and I think this book does give some insight into why teenagers feel they need to turn to drastic actions. For me the book was very powerful but I think it will make everyone that reads it think. 

7. Roxy’s Baby by Catherine MacPhail

Roxy was shaking with fear. She drew in a deep breath. She would not let her fear take over. She couldn’t. She had too much to lose. She had to be strong, to be brave. For once in her life she had to think of someone other than herself. Roxy is wild, uncontrollable. She hates her parents – and her goody-two-shoes sister. Her only solace is her equally wild friends, Pat, Tracey and Jacqueline. Then there is the night of the party, where she lets that boy kiss her, and more …and Roxy is pregnant. Wilfully, she won’t tell her mother, her family. She decides to run away to London. And in London Roxy is found by Mr and Mrs Dyce. They are understanding, sympathetic, and promise her a way out of her troubles. They will take her to a comfortable place, along with other girls in the same position and look after her and her baby – which is exactly what happens. Roxy cannot believe her luck. But Roxy eventually works out the dark truth of the outwardly genial Dyces. 

When a young teenager gets pregnant what should she do? Teenage pregnancy is becoming more and more common. I read this book many years ago when the issue wasn’t so prominent and I think it shows how easily girls can get into trouble if they feel they have no support no matter what happens to them. It will also make you think about being careful trusting people just because they seem older, friendly and helpful.

8. Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

Three children walked away from the cottages on the edge of town toward Berwick Waters. Later that day, only two of them came back. Alice Tully knows exactly what happened that spring day six years ago, though it’s still hard for her to believe it. She’ll never be able to forget, even though she’s trying to lead a normal life—she has a job, friends, and a boyfriend whom she adores. But Alice’s past is dangerous, and violent, and sad… and it’s about to rip her new life apart.

Should you be allowed to have a new live after being convicted of a violent crime? If you were a child and it was an accident shouldn’t you be allowed a second chance? You still have to live with what you have done and trying to be someone else is not an easy way to live. JJ’s story will allow you to consider these questions with a new perspective in your mind. 

9. Slated by Teri Terry

Kyla’s memory has been erased,
her personality wiped blank,
her memories lost for ever.

She’s been Slated.

The government claims she was a terrorist, and that they are giving her a second chance – as long as she plays by their rules. But echoes of the past whisper in Kyla’s mind. Someone is lying to her, and nothing is as it seems. Who can she trust in her search for the truth?

Also about giving criminals a second chance, Slated is a world where criminals have their memories wiped. However could it be that easy? Is this a solution we could seriously consider for our future? 

10 The Shack by Wm Paul Young

Mackenzie Allen Philips’ youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation, and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his “Great Sadness,” Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend. Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack’s world forever.

The Shack is a story about finding God. Who exactly is this figure? and how can we deal with the most terrible thing that could happen to us?  This isn’t your traditional image of God and it will make you consider the many possibilities for God.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books for People Who Like Noughts & Crosses

This weeks Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and The Bookish is the Top Ten Books for people who like X book. I have chosen Noughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman. The books I am recommending that you may like if you like this ones are not all one that I think are written similarly but other books that I think challenge the way we think about our society just as I think this book does.

Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society.

Sephy is a Cross — a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought — a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum — a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together?

In this gripping, stimulating and totally absorbing novel, black and white are right and wrong.

1. Oh My Goth by Gena Showalter

Jade Leigh is a nonconformist who values individuality above all else. She has a small group of like-minded Goth friends who wear black, dabble in the dark arts, and thrive outside the norm. They’re considered the “freaks” of their high school. But when Jade’s smart mouth lands her in trouble—again—her principal decides to teach her a lesson she’ll never forget.

Taken to a remote location where she is strapped down and sedated, Jade wakes up in an alternate universe where she rules the school. But her best friends won’t talk to her, and the people she used to hate are all Goth. Only Clarik, the mysterious new boy in town, operates outside all the cliques. And only Mercedes, the Barbie clone Jade loathes, believes that Jade’s stuck in a virtual reality game—because she’s stuck there, too, now living the life of a “freak.” Together, they realize they might never get back to reality… and that even if they do, things might never be the same

As with Noughts & Crosses this book will make you think about how we judge people on how they look. It is about how we choose to dress at high school though but I think although my of a action book still shows that we should learn about the person not what they look like.

2. Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Everybody gets to be supermodel gorgeous. What could be wrong with that? Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can’t wait. Not for her license — for turning pretty. In Tally’s world, your sixteenth birthday brings an operation that turns you from a repellent ugly into a stunningly attractive pretty and catapults you into a high-tech paradise where your only job is to have a really great time. In just a few weeks Tally will be there.

But Tally’s new friend Shay isn’t sure she wants to be pretty. She’d rather risk life on the outside. When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world and it isn’t very pretty. The authorities offer Tally the worst choice she can imagine: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. The choice Tally makes changes her world forever.

Is also challenging our societies obsession with looks. It is a world were everyone becomes pretty at 16 so we are all the same. However I think it makes you realise how ubsurd it is that we value looks so much that we put our lives at risk.

3. Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

She is pretty and talented – sweet sixteen and never been kissed. He is seventeen; gorgeous and on the brink of a bright future. And now they have fallen in love. But… they are brother and sister.

Seventeen-year-old Lochan and sixteen-year-old Maya have always felt more like friends than siblings. Together they have stepped in for their alcoholic, wayward mother to take care of their three younger siblings. As defacto parents to the little ones, Lochan and Maya have had to grow up fast. And the stress of their lives—and the way they understand each other so completely—has also also brought them closer than two siblings would ordinarily be. So close, in fact, that they have fallen in love. Their clandestine romance quickly blooms into deep, desperate love. They know their relationship is wrong and cannot possibly continue. And yet, they cannot stop what feels so incredibly right. As the novel careens toward an explosive and shocking finale, only one thing is certain: a love this devastating has no happy ending.

Not about looks but still challenging society Forbidden is also a story about unconventional love. Written like Noughts & Crosses the chapters alternate between characters and provide a powerful love story with a strong message and emotional ending.

4. The Hunger Games Triology by Suzanne Collins

In the ruins of a place once known as North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by twelve outlying districts. The Capitol is harsh and cruel and keeps the districts in line by forcing them all to send one boy and one girl between the ages of twelve and eighteen to participate in the annual Hunger Games, a fight to the death on live TV.

Sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives alone with her mother and younger sister, regards it as a death sentence when she steps forward to take her sister’s place in the Games. But Katniss has been close to dead before—and survival, for her, is second nature. Without really meaning to, she becomes a contender. But if she is to win, she will have to start making choices that will weigh survival against humanity and life against love

Is a story about challenging the government, survival and love. Although in a dystopian society Katniss wants to change the way certain groups are treated just like the groups in Noughts & Crosses and it leads her into a dangerous life.

5. The Declaration by Gemma Malley

In the year 2140, it is illegal to be young.

Children are all but extinct.

The world is a better place.

Longevity drugs are a fountain of youth.

Sign the Declaration, agree not to have children and you too can live forever. Refuse, and you will live as an outcast. For the children born outside the law, it only gets worse – Surplus status.

Not everyone thinks Longevity is a good thing, but you better be clear what side you’re on. . . . Surplus Anna is about to find out what happens when you can’t decide if you should cheat the law or cheat death

Is about the consequences of discovering the secret to living forever. This is something that a lot of people want and we are already living for longer but this book shows what happens when there are too many people and it is children that are deemed the problem.

6. Bumped by Megan McCafferty

In 2036 New Jersey, when teens are expected to become fanatically religious wives and mothers or high-priced Surrogettes for couples made infertile by a widespread virus, 16-year-old identical twins Melody and Harmony find in one another the courage to believe they have choices.

Will make you see teen pregnancy in a whole new light. In a society where adults pay teenagers to get pregnant for them love is compromised and the main characters are fighting to be able to be who they want to be not just a womb for rental.

 

7. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picout

Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate — a life and a role that she has never challenged…until now. Like most teenagers, Anna is beginning to question who she truly is. But unlike most teenagers, she has always been defined in terms of her sister — and so Anna makes a decision that for most would be unthinkable, a decision that will tear her family apart and have perhaps fatal consequences for the sister she loves. 

Tells the story of a family when one daughter sues her parents to stop having to help her dying sister. Also written like Noughts & Crosses with alternating chapters it has a similar ability to capture your emotions and will also make you think about how we will do anything for our children.

8. Matched by Ally Condie

Cassia has always trusted the Society to make the right choices for her: what to read, what to watch, what to believe. So when Xander’s face appears on-screen at her Matching ceremony, Cassia knows with complete certainty that he is her ideal mate… until she sees Ky Markham’s face flash for an instant before the screen fades to black.

The Society tells her it’s a glitch, a rare malfunction, and that she should focus on the happy life she’s destined to lead with Xander. But Cassia can’t stop thinking about Ky, and as they slowly fall in love, Cassia begins to doubt the Society’s infallibility and is faced with an impossible choice: between Xander and Ky, between the only life she’s known and a path that no one else has dared to follow

Like Noughts & Crosses is about going against what is expected to be right and falling in love with someone you are not suppose to. When the government decides everything about your life including who you will spend the rest of your life with it your whole life can be turned upside down due to what appears to be a simple technical error that leads to real feelings.

9. Slated by Teri Terry

Kyla’s memory has been erased,
her personality wiped blank,
her memories lost for ever.

She’s been Slated.

The government claims she was a terrorist, and that they are giving her a second chance – as long as she plays by their rules. But echoes of the past whisper in Kyla’s mind. Someone is lying to her, and nothing is as it seems. Who can she trust in her search for the truth?

This book provides a dramatic solution to dealing with criminals in society. What at first might seem like an appealing solution to a problem we are having to deal with this book provides the dangers that could occur. It includes like Malorie Blackmans book a ‘terrorist’  group that disagree with how society if being disciplined and the impact that has on our main characters life could be just as dangerous as it was to Callum’s.

10. Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

Three children walked away from the cottages on the edge of town toward Berwick Waters. Later that day, only two of them came back. Alice Tully knows exactly what happened that spring day six years ago, though it’s still hard for her to believe it. She’ll never be able to forget, even though she’s trying to lead a normal life—she has a job, friends, and a boyfriend whom she adores. But Alice’s past is dangerous, and violent, and sad… and it’s about to rip her new life apart.

Will make you think about how you would feel if you were in the position of having to start your life again as someone new. It will make you decide if you think people who commit very dangerous crimes should be given a second chance, particularly if they offended as children. It is again looking at dealing with crime in society but unlike Callum JJ has a chance to live and prove she can be a useful member of society again.

Extras

The final book in the series, that was originally a trilogy.

I think however that this was my favorite one. Set about 3 years after the end of Specials the main character is Aya a girl that live in a city in what we call Japan. In this city they don’t have money but get merits for helping the community and being famous. Aya wants to become famous like her brother, however to do this has to deceive quite a few people. What she finds could change the world however it ends up getting her into a lot of danger. It is at this point that the characters from the previous books come into it and they all go to try and discover what is going on. What they find allows Aya to grow as a person and realise how important it is to be right before telling stories just for fame.

I think that the idea or a city were fame is everything is very realistic and reflects a lot of people that are living just now. I did however come up with a reason why I may not like these book so much which is that I struggles to like the main characters. In the first 3 books i was frustrated by how Tally couldn’t make up her mind and keep to her loyal’s and I hated that her best friend kept hating her. I found a similar problem with this one as I couldn’t help but get annoyed at how Aya was putting fame before everything else.

I’m glad I have finally read the series and there were moments that kept me reading it. I think if you haven’t read anything like this before it may be a good place to start and I am sure there are plenty people that would like these books but for me they were a one off read.

Specials

The third book in the Uglies series, this one see’s Tally once again operated on and changed. She is finally friends again with Shay but this comes at a cost that will eventually break her heart. She has forgot the desire she one had to be free of the city and putting people she loves at risk tries to help prevent change taking over. However things don’t work out the way she expects and she learns some important lessons along the way.

Although I still struggled to read this book I think it is probably the best one. There is enough going on and surprises to make you want to find out what is going to happen. I still don’t like how some of the relationships with other characters worked out but in the end I think the finally chapter  was a good one.

This series was suppose to be a trilogy however he did write a fourth book. I am going to take a break from them at the moment though and will review the 4th book once I have read some thing more enjoyable.

Pretties

The second book in this series continues Tally’s battle between how you look and how you feel. She has to decide to follow with what she think she wants, and did want when she was younger, and what she is starting to remember in her mind. She continues to deal with new situations trying to help more people. However this comes at a price, that shocked me and I’m not convinced I like.

I think this book is worth reading if you have read the first however I still feel it isn’t as good as other books of the genre. Perhaps is this was the first dystopian series you had read you would enjoy it more, and I still stand by my comment that the idea is an interesting one, however I’m not convinced by the plot and how it’s written. For younger readers however it is very easy to read.