Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Favourite Covers Of Books I’ve Read

The Broke and The Bookish having given us the topic this week of Top Ten Fourite Covers Of Books I’ve Read. Seen as I did this one last year I’m just going to pick my favourites from the books I have read so far this year. A lot of my reading this year has been re-read so there may be a few the same but there is plenty of new ones too.

    

  • Girl, Defective by Simmone Howell
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
  • Dead Time by Anne Cassidy
  • Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter
  • The House of Silk by Anthony Horowitz
  • Matched by Ally Condie
  • Crossed by Ally Condie
  • Reached by Ally Condie
  • How Girl Guides Won The War by Janie Hampton
  • Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan

    

What Are Your Favourite Book Covers?

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Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books With Tough Subjects

This week our topic from The Broke and The Bookish is perfect for me. Top Ten Books With Tough Subjects. I could’t pick just 10 however so I’ve picked 11 topics and shared some worthwhile reads about them as books about tough subjects are ones that I tend to go for. It’s not so much that I like them, in some cases the topic isn’t something you can enjoy reading about, it’s more that I find them interesting. That might sound odd and maybe even horrible to some people but for me I guess it’s partly about knowing that things could always be worse but more allowing myself not to be desensitized by issue that are always in the news and really understand the pain that people are feeling right now and hoping they can get help.

Self-Harm

  • Red Teas by Joanna Kenrick

Incest

  • Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma
  • Flowers in the Attic by Virgina Andrews

Death/Suicide

  • The Pact by Jodi Picoult
  • If I stay by Gayle Formam

Illness

  • Before I Die by Jenny Downham
  • My Sisters Keeper by Jodi Picoult
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  • The puzzle Master be Heather Spiva

Teenage Pregnancy

  • Roxy’s Baby by Catherine MacPhail

Racism

  • Noughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Drugs

  • Junk by Melvin Burgees

War/Genocide

  • Malka by Mirjam Pressler
  • Before We Say Goodbye by Gabrielle Ambrossio
  • Between Shade of Grey by Ruta Sepetys
  • Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
  • Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
  • Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You by Hannah Jansen

Loosing a family member

  • Many Stones by Carolyn Coman
  • The Shack by Wm Paul Young

Bullying

  • Cloud Busting by Malorie Blackman

Criminal Past

  • Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books I Read Before I Was A Blogger

This week we have another good topic from The Broke and The Bookish, out top ten books from before we were bloggers. I think this is a really good topic for bringing back our old favourites and I have made the effort to try and pick mostly books that I haven’t used before in a Tuesday list.

  • Blood Ties & Blood Ransom by Sophie McKenzie  
  • The Pact by Jodi Picoult 
  • Twilight by Stephenie Meyer 
  • Girl, Missing by Sophie McKenzie 
  • Vegan Virgin Valentine by Carolyn Mackler  
  • Oh My Goth by Gena Showalter 
  • Notes From A Teenage Underground by Simmone Howell 
  • Everything Beautiful by Simmone Howell 
  • Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy 
  • Over A Thousand Hills, I Walk With by Hanna Jansen 

What Are Your Favourite Books From Before You Were A Blogger?

Dead Time

Book Blurb

Rose and Joshua first met when Joshua and his dad came to live with Rose and her mum. Then their world turns upside down when their mother and father go out for dinner one evening and never return. With police inquiries going nowhere, Rose is dispatched to live with her chilly, unfriendly grandmother and Joshua is sent to live with his uncle. Then Joshua comes to London to study and Rose is witness to not one, but two murders. Why is this happening to Rose? Can it be anything to do with the investigations Joshua has been doing into the disappearance of their parents? A taut and pacy thriller that is the start of a stylish new series from an acclaimed writer for teens.

My Synopsis

After months of emailing Rose is finally going to see Josh again after 5 years. Although she lives with her Grandmother he is the only one she really feels like is family to her any more and she is both excited and nervous to see him. However she doesn’t get that far as at the train station she bumps into someone from school who likes to taunt her. When he leaves after a phone call she should be relieved but she notices that he is arguing with someone up on the bridge and when he just disappears she decides to go check. To her shock he is still there, but no longer alive.

At college Rose has managed so far to be quite and keep to her self but now everyone wants to know about Ricky’s death. When his girlfriend Emma and her sister come over so isn’t in the mood to be friendly but she tried her hardest to let them know she can’t help. Emma doesn’t want to give up however and when Rose finds herself to close to another murder she feels she has to find out what has happened. 

Josh however is doing his own investigating. Into to disappearance of their parents. Rose doesn’t want to open up old ones but she doesn’t want to lose Josh from her life. However as Rose delve more into their own mysteries it seems they might lead back to her past.

My Review

There were things that I enjoyed about this book but my overall response to it was quite mellow. The characters were interesting enough, they all had their own history mostly full of unhappiness but the way they were brought together was realistic. There was a clear idea for the story with two paths meeting in the middle but I had worked out the murderer very quickly and so after a theory for the link. There was some parts that genuinely had me feel a little nervous though particularly when they were at the graveyard and I feel that for young teenagers this would be a good introduction into a crime/thriller genre.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books That Make You Think

This weeks Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and The Bookish is Top Ten Books That Make You Think. They have suggested books that make you think about the world or people or life. I think my list has books that cover all those area’s although I think most books have some element that makes you think.

1. Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

She is pretty and talented – sweet sixteen and never been kissed. He is seventeen; gorgeous and on the brink of a bright future. And now they have fallen in love. But… they are brother and sister.

Seventeen-year-old Lochan and sixteen-year-old Maya have always felt more like friends than siblings. Together they have stepped in for their alcoholic, wayward mother to take care of their three younger siblings. As defacto parents to the little ones, Lochan and Maya have had to grow up fast. And the stress of their lives—and the way they understand each other so completely—has also also brought them closer than two siblings would ordinarily be. So close, in fact, that they have fallen in love. Their clandestine romance quickly blooms into deep, desperate love. They know their relationship is wrong and cannot possibly continue. And yet, they cannot stop what feels so incredibly right. As the novel careens toward an explosive and shocking finale, only one thing is certain: a love this devastating has no happy ending.

For me this is the most contreversial book I have ever read. Put bluntly it is about incest. Although I don’t like to put my Top Ten Books in an order this is my number one this book because it  is an issue people I have discussed this book with feel very strongly about and I really feel that reading this book will make you reconsider you feelings towards it. 

2. Noughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society.

Sephy is a Cross — a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought — a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum — a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together?

I love this book! Although great changes are occurring we still live in a world where white people are dominant. What makes this book so good is that in a world where black people have all the power we are made to question how we would feel if we were in that position and as a result how people are really feeling right now. I think  Blackman’s idea to change what we see going on is what makes this book so powerful and I hope it makes people think as much as it makes me. 

3. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult

Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate — a life and a role that she has never challenged…until now. Like most teenagers, Anna is beginning to question who she truly is. But unlike most teenagers, she has always been defined in terms of her sister — and so Anna makes a decision that for most would be unthinkable, a decision that will tear her family apart and have perhaps fatal consequences for the sister she loves. 

This book I think raises several issues that will make you think. Should you be allowed to have a genetically engineered child to help its sibling? Can you put one child through hell to save another? Should a young teenager have rights of their own body? This book I imagine must make parents think the most as in essence it is almost like having a favourite child. 

4. Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Everybody gets to be supermodel gorgeous. What could be wrong with that? Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can’t wait. Not for her license — for turning pretty. In Tally’s world, your sixteenth birthday brings an operation that turns you from a repellent ugly into a stunningly attractive pretty and catapults you into a high-tech paradise where your only job is to have a really great time. In just a few weeks Tally will be there.

But Tally’s new friend Shay isn’t sure she wants to be pretty. She’d rather risk life on the outside. When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world and it isn’t very pretty. The authorities offer Tally the worst choice she can imagine: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. The choice Tally makes changes her world forever.

This book challenges our growing obsession with our looks. What would the price really be if we were all pretty? and is it worth it so that we can all feel equal? Personally I don’t think it would be that simple and I don’t think it is worth risking our health for our looks. 

5.You Against Me by Jenny Downham

If someone hurts your sister and you’re any kind of man, you seek revenge, right? If your brother’s been accused of a terrible crime and you’re the main witness, then you banish all doubt and defend him. Isn’t that what families do? When Mikey’s sister claims a boy assaulted her at a party, his world of work and girls begins to fall apart. When Ellie’s brother is charged with the crime, but says he didn’t do it, her world of revision, exams and fitting in at a new school begins to unravel. When Mikey and Ellie meet, two worlds collide. Brave and unflinching, this is a novel of extraordinary skillfulness and almost unbearable tension. It’s a book about loyalty and the choices that come with it. But above all it’s a book about love – for one’s family and for another

Does loyalty to your family come before love? On You Against Me we have too characters who’s siblings have had more than a large fall out. When they meet they are unaware of who each other is and fall for each other however when they realise who each other is they are caught between how they feel about each other and their families. This books make you think about loyalty. If someone in your family gets into trouble should you have to suffer to? 

6. Red Tears by Joanna Kenrick

Emily Bowyer is a normal, confident teenager. But beneath the surface she has a wretched secret. Because, for Emily, life isn’t as much fun as it would appear. Her friends are going off her and her parents only seem to care about her troubled brother. Tension, pressure, anxiety, anger and self-hatred – where does it go when no one will listen?

Red Tears deals with depression and self-harm. When I read this book self-harm was very openly going on in my school and I think this book does give some insight into why teenagers feel they need to turn to drastic actions. For me the book was very powerful but I think it will make everyone that reads it think. 

7. Roxy’s Baby by Catherine MacPhail

Roxy was shaking with fear. She drew in a deep breath. She would not let her fear take over. She couldn’t. She had too much to lose. She had to be strong, to be brave. For once in her life she had to think of someone other than herself. Roxy is wild, uncontrollable. She hates her parents – and her goody-two-shoes sister. Her only solace is her equally wild friends, Pat, Tracey and Jacqueline. Then there is the night of the party, where she lets that boy kiss her, and more …and Roxy is pregnant. Wilfully, she won’t tell her mother, her family. She decides to run away to London. And in London Roxy is found by Mr and Mrs Dyce. They are understanding, sympathetic, and promise her a way out of her troubles. They will take her to a comfortable place, along with other girls in the same position and look after her and her baby – which is exactly what happens. Roxy cannot believe her luck. But Roxy eventually works out the dark truth of the outwardly genial Dyces. 

When a young teenager gets pregnant what should she do? Teenage pregnancy is becoming more and more common. I read this book many years ago when the issue wasn’t so prominent and I think it shows how easily girls can get into trouble if they feel they have no support no matter what happens to them. It will also make you think about being careful trusting people just because they seem older, friendly and helpful.

8. Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

Three children walked away from the cottages on the edge of town toward Berwick Waters. Later that day, only two of them came back. Alice Tully knows exactly what happened that spring day six years ago, though it’s still hard for her to believe it. She’ll never be able to forget, even though she’s trying to lead a normal life—she has a job, friends, and a boyfriend whom she adores. But Alice’s past is dangerous, and violent, and sad… and it’s about to rip her new life apart.

Should you be allowed to have a new live after being convicted of a violent crime? If you were a child and it was an accident shouldn’t you be allowed a second chance? You still have to live with what you have done and trying to be someone else is not an easy way to live. JJ’s story will allow you to consider these questions with a new perspective in your mind. 

9. Slated by Teri Terry

Kyla’s memory has been erased,
her personality wiped blank,
her memories lost for ever.

She’s been Slated.

The government claims she was a terrorist, and that they are giving her a second chance – as long as she plays by their rules. But echoes of the past whisper in Kyla’s mind. Someone is lying to her, and nothing is as it seems. Who can she trust in her search for the truth?

Also about giving criminals a second chance, Slated is a world where criminals have their memories wiped. However could it be that easy? Is this a solution we could seriously consider for our future? 

10 The Shack by Wm Paul Young

Mackenzie Allen Philips’ youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation, and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his “Great Sadness,” Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend. Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack’s world forever.

The Shack is a story about finding God. Who exactly is this figure? and how can we deal with the most terrible thing that could happen to us?  This isn’t your traditional image of God and it will make you consider the many possibilities for God.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books on my Autumn TBR List

As it is now into September this weeks topic from The Broke and The Bookish is Top Ten Books on your Fall (or Autumn to us in the UK) to be read List. I thought with so many books on my shelf and library list this would have been easy but cutting it down to ten was actually quite difficult.

1. Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion

A zombie who yearns for a better life ends up falling in love—with a human—in this astonishingly original debut novel.

R is a zombie. He has no memories, no identity, and no pulse, but he has dreams. He doesn’t enjoy killing people; he enjoys riding escalators and listening to Frank Sinatra. He is a little different from his fellow Dead.

2. Wither by Lauren Destefano

By age sixteen, Rhine Ellery has four years left to live. She can thank modern science for this genetic time bomb. A botched effort to create a perfect race has left all males with a lifespan of 25 years, and females with a lifespan of 20 years. Geneticists are seeking a miracle antidote to restore the human race, desperate orphans crowd the population, crime and poverty have skyrocketed, and young girls are being kidnapped and sold as polygamous brides to bear more children. When Rhine is kidnapped and sold as a bride, she vows to do all she can to escape. Her husband, Linden, is hopelessly in love with her, and Rhine can’t bring herself to hate him as much as she’d like to. He opens her to a magical world of wealth and illusion she never thought existed, and it almost makes it possible to ignore the clock ticking away her short life. But Rhine quickly learns that not everything in her new husband’s strange world is what it seems. Her father-in-law, an eccentric doctor bent on finding the antidote, is hoarding corpses in the basement. Her fellow sister wives are to be trusted one day and feared the next, and Rhine is desperate to communicate to her twin brother that she is safe and alive. Will Rhine be able to escape–before her time runs out?

Together with one of Linden’s servants, Gabriel, Rhine attempts to escape just before her seventeenth birthday. But in a world that continues to spiral into anarchy, is there any hope for freedom?

3. Heist Society by Ally Carter

When Katarina Bishop was three, her parents took her on a trip to the Louvre…to case it. For her seventh birthday, Katarina and her Uncle Eddie traveled to Austria…to steal the crown jewels. When Kat turned fifteen, she planned a con of her own—scamming her way into the best boarding school in the country, determined to leave the family business behind. Unfortunately, leaving “the life” for a normal life proves harder than she’d expected.

Soon, Kat’s friend and former co-conspirator, Hale, appears out of nowhere to bring Kat back into the world she tried so hard to escape. But he has a good reason: a powerful mobster has been robbed of his priceless art collection and wants to retrieve it. Only a master thief could have pulled this job, and Kat’s father isn’t just on the suspect list, he is the list. Caught between Interpol and a far more deadly enemy, Kat’s dad needs her help.

For Kat, there is only one solution: track down the paintings and steal them back. So what if it’s a spectacularly impossible job? She’s got two weeks, a teenage crew, and hopefully just enough talent to pull off the biggest heist in her family’s history–and, with any luck, steal her life back along the way

4. Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia

There were no surprises in Gatlin County.
We were pretty much the epicenter of the middle of nowhere.

At least, that’s what I thought.
Turns out, I couldn’t have been more wrong.
There was a curse.
There was a girl.
And in the end, there was a grave.

Lena Duchannes is unlike anyone the small Southern town of Gatlin has ever seen, and she’s struggling to conceal her power and a curse that has haunted her family for generations. But even within the overgrown gardens, murky swamps and crumbling graveyards of the forgotten South, a secret cannot stay hidden forever.

Ethan Wate, who has been counting the months until he can escape from Gatlin, is haunted by dreams of a beautiful girl he has never met. When Lena moves into the town’s oldest and most infamous plantation, Ethan is inexplicably drawn to her and determined to uncover the connection between them.

In a town with no surprises, one secret could change everything

5. Change of Heart by Jodi Picoult

One moment June Nealon was happily looking forward to years full of laughter and adventure with her family, and the next, she was staring into a future that was as empty as her heart. Now her life is a waiting game. Waiting for time to heal her wounds, waiting for justice. In short, waiting for a miracle to happen. 

For Shay Bourne, life holds no more surprises. The world has given him nothing, and he has nothing to offer the world. In a heartbeat, though, something happens that changes everything for him. Now, he has one last chance for salvation, and it lies with June’s eleven-year-old daughter, Claire. But between Shay and Claire stretches an ocean of bitter regrets, past crimes, and the rage of a mother who has lost her child. 

Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? Would you want your dreams to come true if it meant granting your enemy’s dying wish? 

6. Dangerous to Know by Katy Moran

Alex and Bethany are just two teenagers in love. There’s only one problem: Alex’s family has a dark past, and whilst he and Bethany are desperate to be together, Bethany’s family is desperate to keep them apart.

7. Revived by Cat Patrick

A secret government agency has developed a drug called Revive that can bring people back from the dead, and Daisy Appleby, a test subject, has been Revived five times in fifteen years. Daisy takes extraordinary risks, knowing that she can beat death, but each new death also means a new name, a new city, and a new life. When she meets Matt McKean, Daisy begins to question the moral implications of Revive, and as she discovers the agency’s true goals, she realizes she’s at the center of something much larger — and more sinister — than she ever imagined.

8. Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire

The new Abby Abernathy is a good girl. She doesn’t drink or swear, and she has the appropriate percentage of cardigans in her wardrobe. Abby believes she has enough distance between her and the darkness of her past, but when she arrives at college with her best friend, her path to a new beginning is quickly challenged by Eastern University’s Walking One-Night Stand. 

Travis Maddox, lean, cut, and covered in tattoos, is exactly what Abby needs—and wants—to avoid. He spends his nights winning money in a floating fight ring, and his days as the ultimate college campus charmer. Intrigued by Abby’s resistance to his appeal, Travis tricks her into his daily life with a simple bet. If he loses, he must remain abstinent for a month. If Abby loses, she must live in Travis’s apartment for the same amount of time. Either way, Travis has no idea that he has met his match

9. Dead Time by Anne Cassidy

Rose and Joshua first met when Joshua and his dad came to live with Rose and her mum. Then their world turns upside down when their mother and father go out for dinner one evening and never return. With police inquiries going nowhere, Rose is dispatched to live with her chilly, unfriendly grandmother and Joshua is sent to live with his uncle. Then Joshua comes to London to study and Rose is witness to not one, but two murders. Why is this happening to Rose? Can it be anything to do with the investigations Joshua has been doing into the disappearance of their parents? A taut and pacy thriller that is the start of a stylish new series from an acclaimed writer for teens.

10. Fallen in Love by Lauren Kate

Unexpected. Unrequited. Forbidden. Eternal. Everyone has their own love story.

And in a twist of fate, four extraordinary love stories combine over the course of a romantic Valentine’s Day in Medieval England. Miles and Shelby find love where they 
least expect it. Roland learns a painful lesson about finding-and losing love. Arianne pays the price for a love so fierce it burns. And for the first -and last- time, Daniel and Luce 
will spend a night together like none other.

Lauren Kate’s FALLEN IN LOVE is filled with love stories . . . the ones everyone has been waiting for.

True love never says goodbye… 

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books for People Who Like Noughts & Crosses

This weeks Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and The Bookish is the Top Ten Books for people who like X book. I have chosen Noughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman. The books I am recommending that you may like if you like this ones are not all one that I think are written similarly but other books that I think challenge the way we think about our society just as I think this book does.

Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society.

Sephy is a Cross — a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought — a “colourless” member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. The two have been friends since early childhood, but that’s as far as it can go. In their world, Noughts and Crosses simply don’t mix. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, intensely highlighted by violent terrorist activity, a romance builds between Sephy and Callum — a romance that is to lead both of them into terrible danger. Can they possibly find a way to be together?

In this gripping, stimulating and totally absorbing novel, black and white are right and wrong.

1. Oh My Goth by Gena Showalter

Jade Leigh is a nonconformist who values individuality above all else. She has a small group of like-minded Goth friends who wear black, dabble in the dark arts, and thrive outside the norm. They’re considered the “freaks” of their high school. But when Jade’s smart mouth lands her in trouble—again—her principal decides to teach her a lesson she’ll never forget.

Taken to a remote location where she is strapped down and sedated, Jade wakes up in an alternate universe where she rules the school. But her best friends won’t talk to her, and the people she used to hate are all Goth. Only Clarik, the mysterious new boy in town, operates outside all the cliques. And only Mercedes, the Barbie clone Jade loathes, believes that Jade’s stuck in a virtual reality game—because she’s stuck there, too, now living the life of a “freak.” Together, they realize they might never get back to reality… and that even if they do, things might never be the same

As with Noughts & Crosses this book will make you think about how we judge people on how they look. It is about how we choose to dress at high school though but I think although my of a action book still shows that we should learn about the person not what they look like.

2. Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Everybody gets to be supermodel gorgeous. What could be wrong with that? Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can’t wait. Not for her license — for turning pretty. In Tally’s world, your sixteenth birthday brings an operation that turns you from a repellent ugly into a stunningly attractive pretty and catapults you into a high-tech paradise where your only job is to have a really great time. In just a few weeks Tally will be there.

But Tally’s new friend Shay isn’t sure she wants to be pretty. She’d rather risk life on the outside. When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world and it isn’t very pretty. The authorities offer Tally the worst choice she can imagine: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. The choice Tally makes changes her world forever.

Is also challenging our societies obsession with looks. It is a world were everyone becomes pretty at 16 so we are all the same. However I think it makes you realise how ubsurd it is that we value looks so much that we put our lives at risk.

3. Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

She is pretty and talented – sweet sixteen and never been kissed. He is seventeen; gorgeous and on the brink of a bright future. And now they have fallen in love. But… they are brother and sister.

Seventeen-year-old Lochan and sixteen-year-old Maya have always felt more like friends than siblings. Together they have stepped in for their alcoholic, wayward mother to take care of their three younger siblings. As defacto parents to the little ones, Lochan and Maya have had to grow up fast. And the stress of their lives—and the way they understand each other so completely—has also also brought them closer than two siblings would ordinarily be. So close, in fact, that they have fallen in love. Their clandestine romance quickly blooms into deep, desperate love. They know their relationship is wrong and cannot possibly continue. And yet, they cannot stop what feels so incredibly right. As the novel careens toward an explosive and shocking finale, only one thing is certain: a love this devastating has no happy ending.

Not about looks but still challenging society Forbidden is also a story about unconventional love. Written like Noughts & Crosses the chapters alternate between characters and provide a powerful love story with a strong message and emotional ending.

4. The Hunger Games Triology by Suzanne Collins

In the ruins of a place once known as North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by twelve outlying districts. The Capitol is harsh and cruel and keeps the districts in line by forcing them all to send one boy and one girl between the ages of twelve and eighteen to participate in the annual Hunger Games, a fight to the death on live TV.

Sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives alone with her mother and younger sister, regards it as a death sentence when she steps forward to take her sister’s place in the Games. But Katniss has been close to dead before—and survival, for her, is second nature. Without really meaning to, she becomes a contender. But if she is to win, she will have to start making choices that will weigh survival against humanity and life against love

Is a story about challenging the government, survival and love. Although in a dystopian society Katniss wants to change the way certain groups are treated just like the groups in Noughts & Crosses and it leads her into a dangerous life.

5. The Declaration by Gemma Malley

In the year 2140, it is illegal to be young.

Children are all but extinct.

The world is a better place.

Longevity drugs are a fountain of youth.

Sign the Declaration, agree not to have children and you too can live forever. Refuse, and you will live as an outcast. For the children born outside the law, it only gets worse – Surplus status.

Not everyone thinks Longevity is a good thing, but you better be clear what side you’re on. . . . Surplus Anna is about to find out what happens when you can’t decide if you should cheat the law or cheat death

Is about the consequences of discovering the secret to living forever. This is something that a lot of people want and we are already living for longer but this book shows what happens when there are too many people and it is children that are deemed the problem.

6. Bumped by Megan McCafferty

In 2036 New Jersey, when teens are expected to become fanatically religious wives and mothers or high-priced Surrogettes for couples made infertile by a widespread virus, 16-year-old identical twins Melody and Harmony find in one another the courage to believe they have choices.

Will make you see teen pregnancy in a whole new light. In a society where adults pay teenagers to get pregnant for them love is compromised and the main characters are fighting to be able to be who they want to be not just a womb for rental.

 

7. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picout

Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. The product of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Anna was conceived as a bone marrow match for Kate — a life and a role that she has never challenged…until now. Like most teenagers, Anna is beginning to question who she truly is. But unlike most teenagers, she has always been defined in terms of her sister — and so Anna makes a decision that for most would be unthinkable, a decision that will tear her family apart and have perhaps fatal consequences for the sister she loves. 

Tells the story of a family when one daughter sues her parents to stop having to help her dying sister. Also written like Noughts & Crosses with alternating chapters it has a similar ability to capture your emotions and will also make you think about how we will do anything for our children.

8. Matched by Ally Condie

Cassia has always trusted the Society to make the right choices for her: what to read, what to watch, what to believe. So when Xander’s face appears on-screen at her Matching ceremony, Cassia knows with complete certainty that he is her ideal mate… until she sees Ky Markham’s face flash for an instant before the screen fades to black.

The Society tells her it’s a glitch, a rare malfunction, and that she should focus on the happy life she’s destined to lead with Xander. But Cassia can’t stop thinking about Ky, and as they slowly fall in love, Cassia begins to doubt the Society’s infallibility and is faced with an impossible choice: between Xander and Ky, between the only life she’s known and a path that no one else has dared to follow

Like Noughts & Crosses is about going against what is expected to be right and falling in love with someone you are not suppose to. When the government decides everything about your life including who you will spend the rest of your life with it your whole life can be turned upside down due to what appears to be a simple technical error that leads to real feelings.

9. Slated by Teri Terry

Kyla’s memory has been erased,
her personality wiped blank,
her memories lost for ever.

She’s been Slated.

The government claims she was a terrorist, and that they are giving her a second chance – as long as she plays by their rules. But echoes of the past whisper in Kyla’s mind. Someone is lying to her, and nothing is as it seems. Who can she trust in her search for the truth?

This book provides a dramatic solution to dealing with criminals in society. What at first might seem like an appealing solution to a problem we are having to deal with this book provides the dangers that could occur. It includes like Malorie Blackmans book a ‘terrorist’  group that disagree with how society if being disciplined and the impact that has on our main characters life could be just as dangerous as it was to Callum’s.

10. Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

Three children walked away from the cottages on the edge of town toward Berwick Waters. Later that day, only two of them came back. Alice Tully knows exactly what happened that spring day six years ago, though it’s still hard for her to believe it. She’ll never be able to forget, even though she’s trying to lead a normal life—she has a job, friends, and a boyfriend whom she adores. But Alice’s past is dangerous, and violent, and sad… and it’s about to rip her new life apart.

Will make you think about how you would feel if you were in the position of having to start your life again as someone new. It will make you decide if you think people who commit very dangerous crimes should be given a second chance, particularly if they offended as children. It is again looking at dealing with crime in society but unlike Callum JJ has a chance to live and prove she can be a useful member of society again.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten All Time Favourite Characters in Books

I haven’t really been keep up well with Top Ten Tuesday. I was last for a couple of posts and then totally missed a couple but I decided that for last weeks, which was Tips for Book Bloggers, I would just read the other posts to get some idea’s as I haven’t been doing it very long. 

This weeks Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and The Bookish is the Top Ten All Time Favourite Characters in Books. It was actually a very difficult one to pick as I have read so many books, so they are in no particular order;

1. ‘Freak’ Fred  from The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner by Stephanie Meyer. This book was really good because she has already taken a character out of a book to make a new one. I particularly like the character of Fred as he wasn’t part of the violent world that was surrounding them. He used his skill to keep himself to himself and watch what was going on around him. He knew things weren’t right and he could see the Bree had a quite nature like him and wanted to help her. I would love to find out what happened to him.

2. Zach from The Gallagher Girls series by Ally Carter. What I liked about Zach was that you couldn’t work him out. Sometimes I was convinced by his affection for Cammi but there was always the secrets he was keeping. Even through the latest book there was till questions over whose side he is really on and it make thing interesting. I do think that I want them to be together in the end though, just like Ron and Hermione. 

3. Mr Crepsley from The Darren Shan Saga and The Saga of Larten Crepsley by Darren Shan. When you first meet Mr Crepsley in The Darren Shan Saga you don’t know if he is a good character of not. He seems to be nasty and it is obvious he doesn’t approve of what he is doing. However as you continue through the books you grow to love the character as a wise man that has the ability to be more powerful than he is but wants to do things on his own terms. I really respect that about him, as well as his loyalty to the clan and in the end even Darren. I think the new series just about him has made me appreciate his life more, particularly him as a child and how he came to be the man at that entered Darren’s life.

4. Zero (Hector Zeroni) from Holes by Louis Sachar. In both the book and the film Zero is such a lovable character. He is treated with such disrespect being called stupid but he is just misunderstood. When Stanley takes the time to get to know him you realise that all he really wants is to have his mum again and  if someone just gave him the time he could really be someone great. Together the two make both their lives better and Zero gets to be with his mum again

5. Cinna from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. Cinna is the one character from the capital that seems to still treat people like equals. He sees something in Katniss that the others don’t and brings it out in her even just through clothes. I love that he embraces her pin and makes her brand, even leaving outfits for her. He is my favourite characters in the book because of his humanity in what is such a messed up society. 

6. Neville Long Bottom in Harry Potter by JK Rowling. Out of all the characters in the books Neville is the one of ones that has no bad moments. He is a clumsy new wizard in the first book but develops into being great at something he loves and will make his parents proud. My favourite thing about him however is his courage and although he often comes across as weak and pathetic he isn’t. In book one he stands up to his friends and in book seven he fights for Harry, if courage and loyalty aren’t worth loving nothing is.

7. Dobby from Harry Potter by JK Rowling. Dobby brings something different to the series and I am really pleased that he became such an important part to the story after book two. I think he was developed very well from a pest to Harry to having his own life in Hogwarts and in the end saving Harry and his friends. It was interesting to have a totally non-human character that you could love so much and he definitely enhanced the story.

8. Alice Tully from Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy. During the book Alice is a character that you want to not like but can’t help feel sorry for. Her story is one of tragedy for no just her but those involved and you can’t help thinking that you shouldn’t be feeling that she deserves more. However she is a well written character and it allows you to look at the situation from a different perspective and realise that everyone should be allowed the chance to be free and a good person.

9. Bella Swan from The Twilight Saga by Stephanie Meyer. In the books, particularly the first one, I found that I could relate very well to Bella. She was just a normal clumsy girl and I think the great thing about reading her is that everyone can see themselves in her. It was easy to get caught up in her emotions and wanting to find out the things she did and a good character is what makes a good book.

10. Mister Tom from Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian . At first Tom seems like a typical old man, grumpy and uninterested, but when you learn his story it is easy to understand what mad him that way. I love however that despite of this situation he finds it in himself to deal with this new problem in his life and I think that in the end it allows him to deal with all the issues he has been having. He need someone to help him get motivate and when he opens up and embraces having William you feel so pleased that he can finally move on with his life and fill his home with happiness and love again.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books To Read In A Day

Again my post is late but I do have a real excuse this week; the internet was down because of the snow !!
This week is Top ten books to read in a day. I’ve decided to answer it from the view that if I knew I only had a day to read a book what would I pick off my shelf.

1. Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy

An easy one day read but it is still full of anticipation and a really great read.

2. Red Tears by Joanne Kenrick 

Not a book for younger readers as it deals with a sensitive issue but a very short and powerful book that helps you understand the sometimes complicated inner workings of a teenager.

3. I’d Tell You I Love You, but Then I’d Have to Kill You by Ally Carter 

Action packed and a different idea. This is a story of a school for female spies. A nice interlinking of action and teen romance it will have you wanting to finish in a day.

4. Holes by Louis Sachar 

I really like this book. It is easy to read but also an heartwarming story. I would happily pick this up on any day.

5. The Puzzle Master by Heather Spiva 

A very short story about two young teenagers trying to make the most of living with different untreatable conditions. It seems like an innocent story but actually it is full of a lot more. Worth reading any time.

6. Vegan, Virgin, Valentine by Carolyn Macker

A funny book about coming of age and dealing with all everything that comes with it. Love, last year of exams, fitting in work and dealing with family. An amusing read for a relaxing day off.

7. The Poison Apple’s by Lilly Archer

If you have a spare day this is an amusing little book about dealing with step parents. 

8. Switched by Amanda Hocking

An interesting idea moving away from the typical vampire, wearwolf theme and looking at trolls. Easy to read and an interesting plot line. A good trilogy that you could easily read 1 a day. 

9. The Saga of Larten Crepsley (1) Birth of a Killer by Darren Shan 

If you have read ‘The Sags of Darren Shan’  you will love this short book all about one of the best characters in that series. Easy to read and a very interesting insight into his life

10. my Kindle It may be cheating but it is easy to get really cheap books that only take a day to read and I can’t really pick one. So if you want a quick one day read have a look at the books for kindle and I’m sure you will find one you will like. 

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten Books I’d Play Hooky With

I appologise for how late  my post is but here it is. This weeks Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and The Bookish is the Top Ten Books I’d Play Hooky With.

1.  Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma This has to be my number one choice as this book sort of was used in a skipping work type situation. That is that I read it instead of revising for my Maths exam. It is not something I regret though, as you will know if you have read any other of my Top Ten post. I regard this book as one of the best I have ever read. It is a totally new concept and totally gripping on an emotional level. I couldn’t put it down, I loved it. 

2. You Against Me by Jenny Downham If I am honest it takes about half the book to get really into this story but once you get there it is definatley worth it. It is an unusual situation and told from a really interesting the point of view, the siblings rather than the people that caused the trouble. It is a story about everyone in your family is effected by your actions but how love sometimes is stronger than misbehaving. I think if I got far enough through the book I would be keeping going and missing some class.

3 & 4.   Angel and Angel Fire by L.A. Weatherly Books 1 and 2 of a trilogy that is to finish later this year I have to say I was hooked reading them both. I think I could easily get destracted from going to class whilst reading these as through out them both I was filled with emotion willing the plot line I wanted and dying to find out what happened. Really good action packed books.

5.  Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy This is on here as I did read it whilst off school one day. It is about someone who has been released from prison after many years for a terrible crime and is trying to make a new life for herself with a new identity. It was an easy read but also a really interesting and that one that I enjoyed.

6.  Before I Die by Jenny Downahm I think this would be a good book to miss school for because you can learn so much about real life from it. It teaches you how important the little things are in life and that is to me as important if not more so than acedemic work. For this reason I would miss school/work to read it.

7.  My Sisters Keeper by Jodi Picoult As with above, I think this also book also teaches really important lessons. About love, relationships and how you feel about yourself. I can easily see myself get caught up in this very emotional and gripping story and missing school. It carries you along dying to find it what happens and has a twist just at the right time to keep you hooked till the end.

8.   Rozy’z Baby by Catherine MacPhail A very unusual plot line this book will have you wondering where the story will go. Once you get started you wont want to put it down so you can find out how the story ends. 

9.  Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling I think that there are very few people that can put a Harry Potter book down once they have started. I’m not sure if the first one is my favourite but I like to read them in order and this is a really good first book. I think as it is easy to read you can get carried away and read right till the end.

10.   Divergent by Veronica Roth I had to rush to a few lecture’s once I started this book as I tried to sneak in a cheeky chapter whenever I could. With its well paced plot line it was easy to get carried away in the story and the characters and I would quite happily not go out to read it.